Month: October 2017

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A species of salamander that hasn’t been seen since 1975 has been rediscovered alive and kicking in Guatemala. The biologists who have spent years searching for it are understandably delighted, and it’s also potentially good news for the ecology of the region. The juvenile Jackson’s climbing salamander (Bolitoglossa jacksoni), also known as the “golden wonder”
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Atop a jagged, 50-foot-high (15-metre-high) cliff on the Bahamian island of Eleuthera sit two enormous boulders known as “The Cow and the Bull”. Each is several times taller than a person; the squatter and wider of the two, the “Bull”, weighs around a thousand tons.  The boulders are a tourist attraction, but in recent years, they’ve become
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A new method of using photons to carry information might provide a new wireless solution for communication. A collaborative team of researchers developed a way to ‘twist’ photons to improve on open-area quantum information transfer. Using particles of light, i.e. photons, to transmit information isn’t exactly new. Photons have seen use in a number of
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Proteins, the building blocks in every cell, have usually been thought of as blobs of inert organic matter. Now scientists have caught one particular protein doing something incredible: conducting electricity. If the findings can be replicated and used, we could have ourselves a powerful new diagnostic tool for medical use, capable of identifying single protein
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One of the most widespread security systems used on the internet to prevent non-humans from accessing websites has been defeated by a powerful new kind of artificial intelligence (AI). CAPTCHAs are those frustrating online tests that challenge you to identify fuzzy-looking letters and numbers – which automated bots supposedly can’t recognise. Only now they can,
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In September, to much fame, a man who claimed to have studied astronomy in Kentucky and deciphered the Book of Revelation predicted an ominous sign would appear on September 23 and foretell the world’s end. “It’s a very biblically significant, numerologically significant number,” David Meade told The Washington Post then. A series of catastrophic events
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Scientists have revealed new atomic-level images of the finger-like growths called dendrites that can breach battery compartment barriers, and go on to cause short circuits or even fires. Understanding more about these tiny protrusions is not only going to lead to safer smartphones, it’s going to help us develop stable batteries for our cars, our
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An ancient sea dragon buried for 150 million years has been discovered by Indian researchers, and it’s thought to be the first time an ichthyosaur (Greek for “fish lizard”) from the Jurassic period has ever been found in India. Ichthyosaurs were ocean-dwelling predators that lived alongside dinosaurs in the Mesozoic Era from around 250 million
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A cool new study using virtual reality and ethical dilemmas has discovered that those with psychopathic traits will readily sacrifice the few for the good of the many. But in a scenario that simulated inevitable harm against another human being, participants with strong psychopathic traits also used greater physical force, so we still wouldn’t really